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Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
. >> sreenivasan: wow. dr. alasdiar conn, thanks so much for your time. >> thank you. >> ifill: technology changed the speed and the accuracy with which we learned of the boston attacks. but it also quickly became a platform for the nation's shock and grief. newshour political editor christina bellantoni talked with our daily download team about that. >> for that look at how technology factored into yesterday's tragedy i'm joined by lauren ashburn and howard kurtz, "newsweek's" washington bureau chief and host of cnn's "reliable sources." thanks for being here. after 9/11 we saw people physically putting up photos of their missing loved ones in lower manhattan. yesterday the internet provided a sense of comfort for some. what did we see? >> well, google person finder factored into this. we have a graph that i can show you what it looks like. there's a big button that says "i'm looking for. requests you can type in the name of somebody. or "i have information about" and you can also type in the name of someone. then you can take this tool and embed it on your own web site. so in the aftermath of di
and the technology that officers brought to bear in this search for the suspects out here, particularly the final suspect. bear in mind what was going on all day yesterday. what they were doing was create ago cordon off around watertown, not let him slip away. 7:00, wasn't sure he was there or not. as they shut down the restriction that kept people inside, a man walked out, saw the boat tarp was torn, saw blood on it, saw a person inside and everything changed. we zoom into the neighborhood because that's what hundreds of police officers did, rushing in to set up a line of defense around it while they rushed people away. then, wolf, they brought in the technology. going to demonstrate what we are talking about with this small model. they brought in a thermal imaging helicopter. it can look to the ground and measure anything that's hot down there and see anything giving off any heat, including a human being in a boat in a backyard like that one there. this is what they saw. they had an image of someone in the back of that boat, just as the witness had suspected, and the person was moving around. w
technology, it's the only way to track them. if we invested what we should've in the air traffic system, we would have -- may not solve all of chuck's problems, but a much faster, flowing system. >> by the way, if you modernize it, you can cut back on some of the workforce permanently and save money there. that's the other issue. it's very labor intensive because of the issue that steve just described. >> before we go to break, the president is dining tonight with members of the senate, all women, isn't that nice? >> that's great. >> chuck todd, thank you. we'll see you at 9:00 on the "daily rundown." >> i'm surprised that didn't get ugly just then. >> right. >> that's great. >> we went to counseling. >>> up next, steve rattner has charts on signs of a spring slowdown. more "morning joe" when we come back. but i wondered what a i tcustomer thought? is great, hi nia... nice to meet you nia, i'm mike. what do you drive? i have a ford explorer, i love my car. and you're treating it well? yes i am. there are a lot of places you could take your explorer for service, why do you bring it back to t
time, you could argue that it means a decrease in personnel. because you're using technology, using cameras to replace, you know, eyeballs. but i don't think we've come to that determination. we're down -- the police department is down 6,000 police officers than where we were 11 years ago. so we've already sort of paid the price. and we're using to a certain extent technology to plug the gaps. we're increasing the number of cameras that we have. one of the things that we're doing, we had it in motion prior to the boston marathon. but we want to increase the number of mobile cameras that we have so we can put them up at events and then move them to other events. along our marathon route, we have 220 cameras. but most of them are on bridges. we want to increase at least the public sector cameras that we have along that route. >> all right. new york city police commissioner, ray kelly, thank you very much. it's always good to see you. >> thank you for the great job you keep doing for the city. >> thank you. >>> a new book on afghanistan that's not so good. president hamid karzai had to
technology reporter for cq roll call with the update on the internet bill. thank you for joining us. >> thank you for having me. >> further debate on the internet sales tax bill happening this afternoon when the senate returns from recess at 2:15 eastern. live coverage here on c-span 2. we have a facebook question on the internet sales tax. internet sales tax support or oppose and why? dozens are weighing in. sheri says i support taxing internet sales although i hate paying tax on anything. if we must be taxed on whatever we buy regularly why wouldn't the same hold true with internet sales. jerry writes, he opposes it. a big indication it's a bad idea both amazon and wal-mart support it. why would you think that would be? taxes and regulations favor big retailers because they can cover the higher overhead where smaller businesses typically can not. and rich says, a state should not be allowed to tax people they do not represent. sound familiar? you can offer your comments at facebook.com/cspan. we might use some of your remarks on the air. live now, to the inside of the white house briefing r
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)